Papaws and Prisoners of War?

PAPAW…PAWPAW… PAPAYA

Papaw eggs

1942 ‘TO-DAY’S RECIPE.’, Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 – 1954), 17 December, p. 3. , viewed 19 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42371778

I have been reading the details of a Gympie farm diary for Redslopes at Goomboorian. Farmer Neil Buchanan makes detailed notes of the cases of produce picked and packed: beans, citrus, tomatoes, bananas, papaws, carrots, pineapples and cucumbers. He employed three Italian prisoners of war on his farm.  Angelo, Vince and Salvatore were valued workers.

What has intrigued me are the numbers of cases of papaws being sent to the markets from Redslopes: 25 bags of green papaws, 90 cases, 44 cases, 100 cases, 50 cases, 70 cases. Papaw is a delicate fruit requiring careful handling and has a short shelf life.

Redslopes 1944: “October 9th. Continue preparing today’s load, making a total of 90 cases papaws, 42 cases beans, 20 cases cucumbers, the biggest tonnage every sent in produce.  More beans picked and packed cucumbers likewise as well as papaws being finished.”  

SO the question on my mind is where were all these papaws going?  How were they being used? Was papaw a popular fruit in the 1940’s?

I have been told that ‘ in the old days’  Golden Circle Fruit Salad (canned) used to contain pieces of papaw.  I asked my mother-in-law, a child of the 1940s, about papaws and she told me that her mother peeled and cut into pieces green papaw, boiled, drained and then added salt and pepper.

My way of thinking is that papaw is best served as a fruit on its own.  In recent times it is used green in Thai inspired salads. It is high in Vitamin C and Vitamin A and is used in a popular ointment:Lucas’ Papaw Ointment. Growing up in the 1960s and 1970s we always had papaw trees in the backyard; a much loved fruit of my mother.  Today, it is difficult to buy a good quality papaw in the supermarkets and the best papaws are found at weekend markets.  Papaw is also used in making chutneys.

So what of the 1940s diet and housewives’ use of papaws… a little research and  I found that papaws were a very versatile fruit.  It could be used for all three courses of a meal.  As a vegetable, diced cooked papaw was a perfect accompaniment with grills or light chicken dishes.  It could be served as a vegetable in a white sauce or baked. Papaw juice was being used in the production of unshrinkable wool clothing. And it was reported in February 1945 that:

“MRS. J. SEWELL, of Caloundra, via Landsborough, wins this week’s £1 prize for her directions for making a papaw roll.”
nla.news-page000027303903-nla.news-article248025041-L3-6909dabdb992f42e60cd907f05c50392-0001

Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 – 1954), Sunday 14 October 1945, page 34

If the Italian prisoners of war were wary of mashed pumpkin (as they considered pumpkin to be animal fodder), then I am not sure  how they would have reacted to grilled papaw  or diced papaw served in a lettuce cup with passionfruit, orange, mint, pineapple and flaked fish.

Yes, this history is not just about farmers, army guards and  Italian prisoners of war.

It is about historical farming practices, food on tables; an insight into daily life; recipes; music and much more.

PS Do you know the difference between a mouldboard plough and a disc plough? How much do you know about charcoal burners to fuel trucks? Do you know how charcoal was made during those war years? Did you know that sugar cane farmers in North Queensland had to relinquish their tractors which were then used to build airstrips? Did you know that the American appetite for sweet corn, introduced Australians to this variety of corn? (maize or corn was primarily for animal fodder before the Americans)

Papaw 1945

1945 ‘A Page for the Housewife’, Worker (Brisbane, Qld. : 1890 – 1955), 24 September, p. 14. , viewed 19 Jan 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71454103

 

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